How to learn iOS Development (Part 3)

By Peng Xie

[You can read previous parts of this series here: Part 1  Part 2]

It’s been a long time since the second part of this series was posted. Hopefully my experience on note taking is helpful. In this final part of the blog post, let’s talk about how a developer can evolve from “just being a developer.”

Sky’s the limit

It’s common sense to keep learning for professions like developer. I’m at no position to tell someone what he/she should learn but I think there really shouldn’t be any limit on what a developer can learn. Making an app from scratch involves efforts from different aspects such as design, project management and so on… For instance, basic image editing skills are easy to pick up and will make things way easier when you want to make some small changes to an image you want to use in the app. And knowledge on project management can help you better plan and estimate your development work. In my opinion, having those knowledges and skills can be extremely useful for any developer works independently or in a team. After all, you don’t always have a graphic designer or a project manager in your team.

Always something new

iOS (or Cocoa in general) developer community has been active for a long time and there’re tons of awesome things that satisfy all kinds of needs for developers. For example, ReactiveCocoa framework provides additional APIs for functional reactive programming using Objective-C. And tools like Reveal makes tasks such as debugging user interfaces much easier and efficient. The geeky side of me always like to spend free time to discover and play with new frameworks and tools. It’s an interesting way to learn about new coding styles and enhance your own apps from those open source frameworks. I usually visit Ray Wenderlich’s tutorial website, NSHipster and objc.io to learn about new frameworks and tools. Websites like CocoaControls are also good places to discover UI related frameworks.

One for all, all for one

We benefit a lot from other developers with all their fantastic works on different frameworks and tools. As members of the developer community, we should give back to the community and help other developers whenever we can. Contributing to open source projects and answering questions on websites like Stack Overflow are good ways to learn from other people. We can learn about types of issues other people encountered and discuss different approaches on fixing all kinds of issues. Moreover, having a good profile on GitHub and Stack Overflow also makes you stands out from other people when you try to find a new job.

Where to go from here?

It’s actually never possible “just being a developer.” Sometimes you have to be a graphic designer or a project manager. And if you want to, you can also be an adventurer, a contributor or a tutor. Let us know in comment section what you think about this series and what other topic you want to see in the future.

Keep learning and happy coding!

 

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