WWDC 17: Why am I excited as a developer?

By Peng Xie
wwdc17-og

WWDC 17: Why am I excited as a developer?

It’s been a week since WWDC and I finally got time to write this blog post to express my excitement as an iOS developer. I won’t be talking about the keynote, since it’s pretty much the same every year. Instead, I’ll be focusing on the real deal, WWDC 2017 Platforms State of the Union.

For the non-iOS-developer readers, Platforms State of the Union is a session in WWDC that gives attendees a more technical overview of what’s coming to Apple’s platforms, as its name suggests. Just like previous years, Apple made some really big announcements to its developer community. Let’s see some of my personal favorites.

Xcode 9 Source Editor

As an iOS developer, I use Xcode everyday, which sometimes can be a pain. Xcode’s performance and features are not that strong comparing to some of the competitors. This year, Apple introduced one of the most welcoming changes to Xcode in my opinion – they have re-written the whole source editor from ground up in Swift! The result? 3x faster file opening seed, 60fps scrolling and up to 50x faster jump-to-line action. On top of that, they also implemented an integrated markdown editor, improved coding issue presentation and tokenized editing. What’s even better? A brand new refactoring engine and workflow that is powered by an open-source transformation engine. IntelliJ users may not be that impressed with these improvements. But to me, the all new source editor will give me a huge boost in productivity. I can’t wait for it to come out of beta… (Rule of thumb, don’t use beta Apple softwares on production development works.)

Swift 4

Not surprisingly Swift 4 will be there with Xcode 9. Apple has vastly improved one of the most widely used classes in Swift, String class. In Swift 4, String is now a range-replaceable bi-directional connection, meaning it behaves and can be used like an array of characters now without any sort of conversions. Thanks to the underlying improvements, String now provides 2.5x-3.5x faster processing depend on the language it’s in. Another welcoming news is the introduction of “codable” type. The new type will be synthesized by compiler and has the ability to perform 100% type-safe JSON encode/decode with only one line of code. Apple also made it easier to adopt Swift 4 in Xcode 9. The compiler now supports both Swift 3.2 and 4.0 and allows developer to mix-and-match 3.2 and 4.0 targets. All these improvements makes Xcode 40% faster building large mix-and-match Swift/Objective-C projects. Moreover, building projects using multiple Whole Module Optimization targets is now 2x faster!

iOS 11

One of the biggest announcements in WWDC 17 is iOS 11. For users, iOS 11 blurs the line between a desktop and a mobile OS, which will finally make iPad Pro a viable productivity tool. For developers, this means new APIs to play with. Starting with the new Drag-and-Drop feature, Apple did a phenomenal job making it easier to integrate in apps. It’s automatic for text and web content, and has delegate protocols for customization similar to other iOS APIs. With its cross-process, system-wide multi-touch support and built-in data security, I’m sure developers will start to provide this new feature in their apps to users as soon as iOS 11 becomes available.

Good news for everyone

Along with Xcode 9, Swift 4 and iOS 11, Apple also introduced CoreML for machine learning, Metal2 graphic engine and ARKit for virtual reality. These are only a few that caught my eyes. I am really excited to learn more about CoreML and hopefully can put it to use in one of our apps someday. I truly think Apple has given us developers really good tools and platforms to provide users best features and experiences. This is good news to developers as well as users. A better Apple will surely push its competitors to step up their game, which is something I really like to see. Whether or not you’re a developer or iOS/macOS user, you should be excited too. As consumers, we will always benefit from the competitions.

SAPPHIRE NOW 2016

By Ganpy

My session at HR 2016

-Ganpy

SAP HR 2016 was a return to my home territory as a speaker. The last time I spoke  at an SAP Insider conference (HR conference) was in 2010. So, it has been a while. A lot has changed in the SAP HCM landscape since then. And I have in some ways, moved onto doing more exciting things – not entirely away from SAP HCM, but onto more generic HCM technologies & Mobility in particular. This year, I decided to test how much of a thirst is there among the audience, especially the ones attending SAP HR conferences, for my current pet topic, “Employee Engagement” and decided to submit an abstract during the fall of 2015. I was very clear that this topic is not SAP specific.

The SAP Insider HR conference producers apparently thought there was enough interest in my topic and in my abstract & selected my topic and invited me to speak. I have to thank them for their confidence in me. Creating the right content for this session was not very difficult, but I had fun doing it. And also, it helped me organize what I wanted to convey to my audience in a very organic and an organized way. I delivered my session today (02/26) as scheduled and I was satisfied with the overall flow, reach and audience participation.

Thorsten Gorny and Steve Ditty, my lovely colleagues from Cogent IBS accompanied me to Las Vegas this year. We had a great time bonding & talking about HR, Coobo, Cabaana and Cogent in general.

Here are a few pictures from the last 4 days.

If you are interested in downloading/reading my presentation, here you go…
Enjoy!

 

 

 

The Conference Month

HR Tech Europe and Web Summit

So we are back to our home bases. Was a hectic month for Team Cabaana.
Here are some pictures from these events.

HR Tech Europe (Paris)

This is the conference where we had a soft launch of Cabaana. Great conference and we got some wonderful feedback. We also got 10 minute stage time at the disruptHR zone.

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Web Summit (Dublin)

We took part in this conference in the Alpha Start-up section. A very different forum for us as this summit included start-ups of all kinds. Again, a great experience with lots of positive and some critical feedback.

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HR Tech World Congress

By Ganpy

HTtechparis_LIVE-300x192

This is just a quick post to share with our readers that Team Cabaana will be at the HRN – HR Tech World Congress in Paris. This is touted to be the largest HR Technology Conference in Europe and is a 2 day event. And the Expo hall will be a fun place to hang out for any technically inclined HR person.
Cabaana will be showcased in the Startup pavilion. In addition, Ganpy & Thorsten will also get an opportunity to talk about Cabaana’s story on the DisruptHR stage.

Overall, this is a big stage because Cabaana, the product will be officially launched during this conference, but the scale of this event is made even bigger from Cabaana’s standpoint due to the above mentioned reasons.

We will report more about the conference and about our experiences there soon after.

Google I/O 2015 – A Developer’s Perspective

By Xinye Ji

Google I/O was a rather anti-climactic one in some ways. People were expecting a whole new refresh like Lollipop was last year. A lot of people were expecting a new Nexus 5. (Which may or may not have been previewed when introducing the new USB Type C connector…) Instead, Google focused on support, stability and efficiency.

So, in the eyes of many, maybe Google I/O wasn’t so exciting as it was more of a ‘tock’ instead of a ‘tick’ kind of update. However, for both Google and Android developers, this update lets us breathe a sigh of relief. New letter (like L or, in this case, M)  versions typically introduces more fragmentation issues that Android has been so infamously known for. This time around, while we see some features that are not supported in older versions of Android (such as the revamp of app permissions), the support and backwards compatibility of said features won’t completely break the app one hundred percent.

The Android M preview also released with its developer counterpart Android Studio 1.3 along with the 1.3 gradle plugin.

The Good:

Android NDK

For those of you unaware, the Android NDK allows developers to work natively in C or C++. I’m personally quite excited about this, as this allows a much wider spectrum of developers to pick up Android development. I’m sure we’ll see some amazing libraries come out in the ensuing months, perhaps more hardware and low level control.

The Bad:

Additionally, during the “What’s new in Android Testing?” presentation. Many, many features were slated for “in the next few weeks.” It’s unfortunate, but it seems some things in the product were not ready in time for Google I/O.

The Ugly:

This build is… buggy to say the least. The initial release of the 1.3 Canary build had some expected errors; like having trouble switching to the M preview build, and certain gradle issues that came with that. But it also had other issues, such as telling you that your overridden classes never implemented the super class, when it clearly did.

The issue has since been patched, and I understand this is a canary (very early beta) build, but come on guys…!!

One thing is very clear for this year’s Google I/O, however.

                           A Focus on Just Making Better Apps.

Performance:

One big thing is the Captures feature on Android Studio. This allows you to get the CPU metrics for your connected device. I recall this use to be a giant cluster of irrelevant data. Now they have more intuitive UI and a very well detailed metrics that will help you search CPU hangups and memory leaks.

Theme Editor:

If any of you have done Android Development, one huge pain was setting up themes. This time around, there is a new theme and layout editor. The theme editor has some amazing items. It helps you integrate material design to your app, and it removes a lot of the boilerplate you need to generate.

Additionally, we have a revamped layout editor. This editor definitely seems new and improved. The demo at Google I/O didn’t generate a bunch of gibberish code, and the visual UI designer has piqued my interest. In fact, I suspect many developers may start using that rather than blindly typing into the XML file and hoping the UI looked as intended.

Sadly at the time of posting, this tool is not yet available on the preview.

Android Design Library:

Since I learned about material design, I’ve always wanted proper support for material design. At Google I/O this year, the Android Design Library was released, which has been basically everything I wanted from Google as far as implementing Material Design, as well as supporting Material all the way back to Froyo (Android 2.1).

Testing:

There was a large chunk of support for testing during Google I/O. Including testing UI, proper unit testing, and automation of said tests. A lot of the testing process is now more tightly integrated with Android Studio. And I, for one, am very excited to check these out in my own geeky way.

The one major thing that all these things have in common is that they are incredibly mundane to the end user, but incredibly exciting to most developers. The updates to these tools will help us improve our development process to make better, more consistent, more reliable, and more powerful apps.

Opposite View: WWDC15 Keynote from a Developer’s Perspective

By Peng Xie

OS X El Capitan

  • Oh the new name, good luck translating it into other languages…
  • Pinned Sites in Safari: It’s gonna be useful when browsing Facebook, Twitter, etc. at work, class… Apple’s engineers really understand what we want after all.
  • Enhanced Spotlight: I actually didn’t know you couldn’t check weather and search things with your own words with Spotlight in Yosemite.
  • Mail App: I’m gonna write emails to all the people I know with all the tabs I can have in new Mail app’s compose window and still ignore emails from Phil Schiller because I can search for all emails I ignored from Phil!
  • Spilt View and Window Management: Seems like Apple learned something from Windows 7?
  • Metal for Mac: RIP Open GL… While the PC gamers are playing GTA5 with awesome graphic, Mac gamers are still stuck with games like vegetables vs zombies. Let’s see if these big game companies can convince PC gamers to buy Macs.
  • Have I mentioned that El Capitan is faster than Yosemite?

iOS 9 and WatchOS 2

  • Siri now has a new animated interface. I wonder what will you see if you look at it with red-blue 3D glasses…
  • Siri can also do way more than it (she?) could before based on its (her?) soundings.
    • “🎵It sees you when you’re sleeping… It knows when you’re awake…🎵”
  • Like in OS X, Spotlight on iOS has received a new interface and can now look into your apps for search results.
  • Apple Pay now works at more places than ever! And apparently Apple and Google seem to have reached some agreement to switch the names of their payment app. Yes, I’m looking at you, Android Pay and Apple Wallet.
  • Happy drawing in the new Notes app!
  • Maps app can now tell us which bus/train to take to go to places!
  • Apple now lets you choose what news you wanna read in its new News app, as long as you’re in US, Australia or UK.
  • People have been asking for an “iPad Pro” for some time now. Apple’s answer to it is a new QuickType keyboard with shortcuts plus touchpad capability and a more powerful multitasking feature (Samsung, get your lawyers ready!).
  • You’ll be able to use the awesome Picture in Picture and Split View feature if you have the latest iPad Air 2.
  • Swift 2 will be open source later this year, available for iOS, OS X and Linux. I feel sorry for Windows because it won’t get all the wonderful new features comes with Swift 2.
  • It seems like WatchOS 2 can finally do what it suppose to do a long time ago. Apple has finally given access to normal frameworks and features like animation & layout for Apple Watch.

Everything about Music

  • For $9.99 a month, you get another Spotify alternative. That’s it.
  • And the crazy developers at Apple are developing an Apple Music app for Android as well!

Overall impression
I am not happy about this keynote and it’s not because there’s no new Apple TV or other new toys. WWDC is a developer conference and it should focus on new operating systems and SDKs, not music. Unlike previous years’ WWDC, Apple rushed through announcements and demos and spent what seems like forever for their new music streaming service. I understand it’s important business for Apple but they really should have spent more time talking about WatchOS 2 and Swift 2.

Not Impressed

Not Impressed